Moab Utah Trails & Maps, Trail Guide

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Trails

Sheer canyon walls, burn orange slick rock that seems to run off into infinity, expansive stone arches, and pristine rivers and creeks are just a few of the many natural splendors hikers will experience on Moab area trails.

Overview

Hikers come to Moab for an opportunity to experience some of the most beautiful scenery found anywhere on earth. From burnt orange slickrock, to sheer canyon walls, expansive stone arches, and pristine rivers and creeks; Moab has something for everyone.

Popular Hikes

Hikers in Moab have an almost unlimited number of options when it comes to trails. These are a few of the more popular area hikes.

Fisher Towers Trail
Hikers come to the Fisher Towers trail for a chance to experience the Fisher Towers, a grouping of about 12 large stone monoliths that rise in excess of 900 feet from the ground.

Corona Arch Trail
Visitors are treated to views of one of the most beautiful stone arches in all of Moab. The Corona Arch soars to over 105 feet in height and covers a span of 140 feet.

Negro Bill Canyon
This beautiful canyon hike culminates in views of Morning Glory Bridge, the sixth largest natural stone bridge in the world with a span of 243 feet.

Planning Ahead

Most Moab trails are accessible year round though snow is possible in the winter and extreme heat is probable in the summer. During the winter, dressing in layers is advisable as you will be able to adjust your clothing as your temperature changes. During the summer, make sure to pack plenty of sunscreen and wear light, moisture wicking clothing. Always remember to pack water, and carry the 10 Essentials: a map, compress, sunglasses and sunscreen, extra food and water, extra clothes, headlamp, first aid kit, fire starter, matches, and a knife.

Leave No Trace

When hiking in Moab, always be sure to follow leave no trace principles. Pack-out what you pack-in, camp at least 200 feet from water sources and trails, and deposit solid human waste in holes dug 6 to 8 inches deep, also at least 200 feet from water sources and trails.

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