Monument Valley, Navajo Reservation Tribal Park

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Navajo Reservation

Monument Valley is part of the Navajo Nation Tribal Park, which preserves and promotes the richness of the Navajo culture. Situated in the southeastern stretches of Utah and spilling into Arizona and New Mexico, the land of the Navajo reservation is among the most unforgettable places on the planet.

Navajo History

Historically, the story of the "Dineh" people (as they are named in the Navajo language) is one mired with tragedy, yet restored by faith and endurance. In the 1860s, the Navajo population was decimated during the "Long Walk," that forced mass exodus onto federally designated reservations. The tribal nation was reduced to 8000 citizens. However, today the Navajo Nation is 210,000 strong.

Navajo Today

The tribal government was formed in 1923. Its structure is comprised of an elected tribal chairman, vice chairman and 88 council delegates that represent 109 local units. The main sources of revenue for the Navajo Nation are through tourism, natural resource extraction, and agriculture.

Navajo Culture

Culturally, the Dineh embrace the heritage of their ancestors by preserving the use of healing herbs, medicine men, songs, prayers, and ceremonies to cure diseases of body and spirit. Traditional dishes are still prepared using wild vegetables and herbs. Many wear traditional clothing, even if it is only for important religious or social events.

Monument Valley

The Monument Valley region of the Navajo Nation is one of the most geographically stunning destinations in North America. The red sandstone mesas, buttes, and spires have not only earthly significance to the Dineh, but also inspirational purpose as well.